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Robert Hone (Roberthone)

Joined on 2012/6/1 9:18:48 PM
Over 30 years spent at sea serving in a cross section of vessels from STA Sir Winstan Churchill to the Queen Mary 2 via The Replica Endeavour and Tectonia!
A Cunard deck cadet, I came to the Plymouth School of Maritime Studies from Helston in 1977 to start my career at sea.
From 1981 to 1983- worked on the UK coast with the Barbican based Cornish Shipping Company. We carried China Clay and other various (Very High Value) cargoes accross the Channel, in a selection of old and very old coastal ships.
In 1983 I joined Curnow Shipping on the RMS St Helena and saw action in the Falklands Crisis. This included sailing to South Georgia and Elephant Island, and then trading to the Island of St Helena and Tristan da Cunha.
I was to spend 17 years with Curnow Shipping finally sailing as relief Master in 1999. During this time I also worked as a Crown Agent Marine Superintendent for on /off hire surveys and Supercargo for loading operations with the MOD. This was to include fast deployment /recovery in war zones.
In 1999 I returned to the Cunard Steam Ship company as a First Officer. Over the next ten years promoted through Senior First Officer to Staff Captain. Became an Environmental Officer when Cunard was swallowed by Carnival USA. Cunard was then incorporated with Princess Cruises and I returned to driving on the bridge as Snr First /Safety/ Chief Officer.
In 2004 Cunard launched the largest ever Transatlantic Liner, the Queen Mary 2. I had the privilege to sail on her as Chief Officer for her inaugural year.
I was honoured to sail on the Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2) as Staff Captain in her final year .
2010 found me sailing on board theP&O Cruise ship AURORA as Safety Officer / Staff Captain waiting for the next Cunarder to come along when I saw an advertisement for a Lecturer in Maritime Studies with Plymouth University.....
Language
English
Expertise
Careers - Deck/Navigation, Careers - ...
Country
United Kingdom
User Type
Mentor
Gender
Male
Years of Experience
33 years at sea, 3 years in Lecturin...
Prof. Designations
MM, BA Hons (Open) MNI PGCAP FHEA
First Name
Robert
Last Name
Hone
Member of 5 Groups
Library Quick Links no Quick Links Saved
5 Members Watching SUNDAY ATEIZA and 4 others
Careers - Deck/Navigation (1)Careers - Maritime Training (1)
I am a Maritime Mentor

Discussion

Good news-

I think that its more me finding my way around the site....

Have a peaceful weekend

Bob
Hi Murray-

Is it me or are other members finding it difficult to reply using the "Blue Button"?

Bob
Good question - I have been getting some responses. Are you not? I see the site membership continues to grow. If we can keep it up we should soon reach a critical mass where the activity is more regular. There are a number of things which will help that move along coming in the next couple months. So I remain optimistic that we will have something of use here. It always takes some time and patience, however.

Take care and thanks as always!

Hi Murray-

Is it me or are other members finding it difficult to reply using the "Blue Button"?

Bob
Hi Murray-

Thanks again - my comments were a response to your intresting artical.

Is it me or are other members finding it difficult to reply using the "Blue Button"?

Best wishes from a (very) windy Plymouth,

Bob
Bob - thanks for this. Coincidentally, I recently wrote a blog on this.

It is entitled: What Language Should be Used in Maritime Training?

The preamble is:

The maritime industry, by definition, is international. Yet mariners from all corners of the earth are required to work together, communicate and interact. They are also required to train and be trained. But what language should be used to deliver their training? This article looks at bilingual training as one possibility for MET.

The full text can be found here:

http://www.maritimeprofessional.com/Blogs/Maritime-Training-Issues/August-2012/What-Language-Should-be-Used-in-Maritime-Training-.aspx
Bob - thanks for this. Coincidentally, I recently wrote a blog on this.

It is entitled: What Language Should be Used in Maritime Training?

The preamble is:

The maritime industry, by definition, is international. Yet mariners from all corners of the earth are required to work together, communicate and interact. They are also required to train and be trained. But what language should be used to deliver their training? This article looks at bilingual training as one possibility for MET.

The full text can be found here:

http://www.maritimeprofessional.com/Blogs/Maritime-Training-Issues/August-2012/What-Language-Should-be-Used-in-Maritime-Training-.aspx
The Use of English at Sea..
When I was working on the Cunard liners we had strict "English Only" in the public areas and when working for all crew members. On these ships we may have over 35 different nationalities and they all used and learnt English. The standard was excellent and rarely did we have problems with misunderstanding.
I have since sailed on various other cruise ships and find it very difficult if I hear crew using their native language. The senior officers /heads of department and supervisors have to insist on English being used whilst working.
On large cruise ships English has to be the default language in emergency situations.
Clear simple English. Easy!
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